Tag Archive for: Realty Network Group

Homebuyers, 2023 may be your year! There’s no guarantee next year will welcome a buyer’s market, but recent indicators are trending in that direction. Though properties are still moving for sellers in our market, they need to be priced right and there must be an element of enticement for prospective buyers, such as its location or curb appeal. Buyers can start getting down to business. They can deal with the market at their own pace and with very little pressure.

Some never caved to outside influences, especially those who could be patient and didn’t need to purchase a home. The winds in our market are shifting. Yes, inventory is bleak, scarcer than it was only three years ago. In July of 2019, 1,387 active listings sat on the market, this past July only a fraction of that – 553 listings – down 60%. And even less today with 532 residential listings currently active.* Many professionals in the industry thought the housing supply would recover by now, but that remains to be seen. Furthermore, the national supply is up year-over-year, over a 30% increase, the largest jump since 2017.

So where is this shift occurring? First, buyers are beginning to see the housing shortage disappear (at least on a large scale). Secondly, there’s a seasonal shift to buying and selling, this is traditional and it’s obvious, it’s “back to school” and it’s the onset of the autumn season, but it’s also temporal. Next, the pool of buyers has dwindled in recent months, placing more tension back upon the sellers. Buyers have faced climbing interest rates since the beginning of the year when they hovered near 3%. Though recent weeks have seen decreases to the mortgage rates, they currently sit around 5.5-5.6%. Buyer as well as sellers have been affected by these increases. Finally, buyers are regaining the upper hand over sellers. Now, they’re looking back to contingencies and leaning on them when signing sales agreements. When competition was fierce between buyers for over two years, this rarely happened.

“It’s certainly a breath of fresh air,” explains Ann E. Cappellini, Associate Broker for Realty Network Group. “There’s a stronger sense of hope for those looking to buy a home, though obstacles still remain.” Buyers can get more realistic nowadays. As long as they have the means financially, the way is less burdensome. With less resistance, homebuyers can use contingencies, such as home inspections to weigh their options, if and when sizable issues present themselves.

When the financial risks of an escrow deposit arise, it’s in the buyer’s best interests they utilize inspections, mortgage and/or appraisal contingencies. According to Redfin, escrow is a legal arrangement where typically a third party will temporarily hold the buyer’s deposit (often used as a down payment or toward their closing costs) until the deal is consummated. In Pennsylvania, the listing Brokerage will generally hold the earnest money deposit (not a neutral third party), though this isn’t always the case. “Escrow matters in Pennsylvania, like many other states, are held in strict compliance with the Real Estate Licensing & Registration Act (RELRA) and the state’s agreement of sale, which has been formulated by the Pennsylvania Association of REALTORS® (PAR),” emphasizes Cappellini. “During the homebuying escrow period of a sale, though the deposit might be held in the listing agency’s escrow account, the money may not be commingled with other funds and furthermore not released to either party, if the Broker is in receipt of a verifiable written notice that there’s a dispute over those funds and it’s subject to mediation or litigation.” Escrow is a serious matter in real estate, especially in our state, and as such, RELRA and PAR specifically outline how earnest money is to be handled from the beginning to the end of all transactions.

Yes, contingencies can kill a transaction and they certainly impact a deal, but they’re in place to protect buyers. These protections are good for both parties, even though it doesn’t always appear so for sellers. Perhaps a deal goes south due to one of the clauses employed by the buyer. It doesn’t go as expected and the buyer is able to receive their deposit monies back. On the flip side, if it’s understood that all the contingencies are met and the buyer walks away or defaults on the deal, the seller might be entitled to the deposit and can also sue for specific performance. Whether you’re a buyer or seller, make sure to discuss with your REALTOR® how contingencies in a real estate transaction can impact you. You’ll be glad you did!

It’s exciting when you decide that it’s the right time to grab your first investment property. However, if you’re new to these kinds of purchases, it’s also intimidating. Fortunately, as our experts understand, you can handle everything properly if you know how to approach it.

Finding the Right Investment Property

The Market

Calling the housing market hot can feel like an understatement. The median sale price for residential properties in the US was just over $408,000 at the end of 2021 and home prices across the country year-over-year (YOY) still exceed 20%, according to CoreLogic. In the Greater Scranton market, median home sale prices have been trending up at a YOY rate of 13.8%, more than the increase from a year prior (July 2020 to July 2021).*

By and large, prices have trended upward for the past few years and it isn’t uncommon for buyers to spend over list price, with some going for many thousands above list.

However, the price can vary throughout a particular area. Overall, each neighborhood can come with its own vibe and price point. As a result, where you buy matters, both from a cost and desirability standpoint.

When searching for investment properties, be sure to partner with one of our real estate professionals. They can help navigate the particulars of purchasing a home in Northeastern Pennsylvania. 

Features of Desirable Properties

When looking for investment properties, you need features that appeal to renters. For example, ValuePenguin notes that 53% of consumers want a home office over an extra bedroom. In some areas, open floor plans may typically be preferred. For downtown properties, a parking space might be a necessity, too.

Since traffic can be challenging, finding a location near convenient roadways or close to critical amenities like stores or medical centers (or even pizza!) is also essential. That way, renters won’t have to go far to get what they need.

If you’re looking at family-sized residential investment properties, then choosing one with exceptional school ratings is a smart move. That’ll make the home more attractive to parents, increasing its potential value.

The same goes for homes with large yards. Whether it’s parents or renters with dogs, having outdoor space may be high on the list. If the yard isn’t in great shape, making some outdoor improvements may be all it takes to elevate its curb appeal.

For instance, you could connect with local contractors to install a new fence, if it’s allowed by your homeowners association and/or the local municipality. Ensure they’re licensed, insured and check for underground utility lines. Next, read reviews online. Then, reach out to discuss your needs and get a quote. While the average price can vary (and it usually does in this market with distribution and supply issues that contractors typically encounter), the size, materials and location play a role, so get several estimates in advance to ensure you’re in the ballpark.

Managing the Investment Property, Beginning with Forming an LLC

Before getting into the investment property business, make sure you’ve set up a limited liability company to operate under. This will help protect you from personal liability, as well as confer tax benefits to you. You can accomplish this relatively simply by using a formation service. Once you find the right property, then you’ll need to determine how to manage it. Usually, you have two choices.

First, you can operate as the landlord, and as such, you’re responsible for all activities relating to the lease property. Along with advertising the property, you’ll screen tenants, collect rent, handle maintenance calls and more. In some cases, that also means enforcing the lease – a task that often lacks enjoyment and may not always go as planned – and handling evictions, if needed. It’s a full-plate for sure, but it’ll allow you to keep all of the profits too.

Second, you can hire a property manager. By using this approach, you’ll end up with less profit in exchange for support handling the property. The property manager will handle practically most everything, including screening tenants, accepting payments, tackling repair requests and the like. They’re also an ally for lease enforcement, ensuring you don’t have to address violations directly unless an eviction becomes necessary.

Which option is best depends on how hands-on you’d like to be along the way. While you’re always involved, a property manager reduces your burden in exchange for a fee, giving you access to support and expertise. However, if you’re confident in your capabilities, that may be unnecessary, as many investors manage their own properties.

* statistics from the Greater Scranton Board of REALTORS® (July 2020-July 2020)

 

[This content is compliments of Fix It Dads.]

The search for a home begins online. It has for some time. In fact, consumers are surveying the terrain and pouncing on anything that hits the market like a school of piranha, unsure of when their next opportunity to eat will surface. You can’t blame homebuyers either. Today, the ones that remain, still looking to purchase, have repeatedly struck out in their attempts for homeownership. Now, feeling the pressures of inflation, higher mortgage rates and rising home prices, they’re looking to get in before the door closes on their “must-haves” and what they can afford.

The winds of a housing shortage have shifted, new listings with a slowdown in purchases have given way to more selection – finally some welcomed news for prospective shoppers. Yet the search becomes very real for them as they exit the digital environment, previewing actual houses, and doing so in a more urgent manner than buyers did only three years ago. Buyers should rely on the services of a real estate professional whenever possible, because representation is critical for protecting the interest of buyer-clients, especially in this market. And you probably have questions.

What type of real estate professionals exist today and what do they look like? There are four main distinctions homebuyers should be aware of, and they are: real estate agents, REALTORS®, REALTORS® with an ABR® designation and Brokers.

  • Real estate agents – Independent contractors who are connecting buyers and sellers and are licensed to help others rent, buy or sell real estate. Licensure requirements vary from state to state. These professionals should not be confused with REALTORS®, but regularly are.
  • REALTORS® – Licensed real estate agents who are also members of the National Association of REALTORS® (NAR) and must likewise adhere to this organization’s code of ethics. These professionals can include real estate appraisers, salespeople, Brokers and more.
  • REALTORS® with ABR® designation – Members of NAR who have a particular skill set and frequently work with homebuyers in their day-to-day business. These professionals are usually more in accord with the trends affecting buyers and are equipped with knowledge to help their buyer-clients succeed.
  • Brokers – Licensed professionals who further their education, and if they so desire, can open their own real estate firm, hiring independently contracted agents to work under them. They perform many of the same tasks as the agents they hire, but there’s a distinction between the two.

A handful of real estate agents become Brokers after a period of time in the business. Often those pursuing licensure as a Broker are ready to dedicate more study to this field. They’ve firmly planted themselves within the real estate turf surrounding them. Having said that, real estate agents who aren’t Brokers can and are certainly encouraged to dedicate more time and study to the business as well.

What is it like to be a Broker? “The dynamics of real estate have changed significantly over the past five years, but the standards of practice remain the same,” emphasizes Dianne Montana, Principal Broker for Realty Network Group. “I enjoy working with a talented group of professionals, helping them thrive, ultimately paving the way for our clients to buy and sell successfully.” Being a Broker allows for additional independence (more than solely being an independent contractor), but with that comes greater responsibility. Brokers are responsible for supervising the agents in their Brokerage and ensuring the office/company is in compliance with national and state real estate laws and regulations. Real estate Brokers face their fair share of liability as well, and as such, it’s important for Brokers to possess an advanced skill set in order to be both distinguished and ethical.

As a homebuyer, which of these four types should you seek when actively looking to acquire property? There’s no clear cut choice, but a REALTOR® is definitely a great starting point. Those specializing in servicing buyers generally provide the best opportunity. Furthermore, a REALTOR® with an ABR® designation could be a perfect match, especially for first-time homebuyers. Can you go wrong with a Broker? Usually not, but it’s imperative that those pursuing real estate do their due diligence in finding a professional they can work well with, one who actively listens and has a tract record for success.

As a homebuyer, the landscape can be downright intimidating these days. Yes, multiple offer situations exist now, but this is changing and by July they might all but cease. First-time buyers can especially have concerns in this market, which is still a seller’s market, even though the pendulum is shifting. Why the concern? Well, interest rates have climbed and aren’t going down anytime soon. Furthermore, there’s still competition from other buyers who are eager to purchase, have been looking for a while and haven’t been priced-out of the market yet. There are many forces to consider when given the opportunity to buy real estate. Buyers in our region (Northeastern Pennsylvania) are paying about $300 more per month for a home via lender financing than they would have only six months ago for the same house. This is because rates have crept up about 2.5% points since January.

Lately, the Pennsylvania Association of REALTORS® (PAR) made some clarifications to one of their standard forms, the Appraisal Contingency Addendum (ACA), in an effort to clear up a little of the confusion surrounding buyer and seller rights and obligations surrounding the purchase of a property, specifically if a home fails to appraise. These changes will take effect on July 1, 2022. There’s been a misunderstanding in recent years about what the appraisal contingency means exactly for both parties and why the buyer doesn’t have the right to terminate an agreement of sale, if the appraisal contingency falls away, but that’s another conversation altogether.

As we mentioned above, there are still homes selling for over list price and there will be pockets of this type of activity I’m sure during the next few weeks. The concern for many potential buyers today is where does it put me if the appraised value of the home I’m looking to purchase comes in lower than the actual purchase price? This is a legitimate consideration. Thankfully, in Pennsylvania, the purchaser, through guidance from their REALTOR®, can rely on what’s called the “minimum appraised value” to protect them in the transaction. This would be the lowest value an appraiser could produce that would require the buyer to continue with the purchase. The ACA is there to accompany the sales contract and help these parties make every effort to continue forward in good faith toward settlement.

Of course, it doesn’t always work out for one or both parties, but protections like the appraisal contingency can help buyers sleep at night. “Homes failing to appraise happens more than you might think, even now,” asserts Maria Muchal Berta, Associate Broker for Realty Network Group and Owner/Certified Residential Appraiser of Chiave Appraisal Group. “It really depends if the buyer has the money to close the gap between the purchase price and its appraised value. How badly do they want the home? In some cases where the appraised value falls short of the purchase price, where there’s a will, there’s a way.”

Angelo Ambrosecchia, Loan Officer for Guild Mortgage breaks down many of the intricacies involved in the following scenarios where homebuyers are seeking to secure funding for a home purchase.

“Prior to us getting involved, many transactions are negotiated that up to a certain price point, the buyer will pay the difference out of pocket, if a home appraises low. For example, someone is buying a home for $290K. If it appraises for $280K, they agree to pay the difference out of pocket, again, up to a certain amount. With inventory levels so low, we’re seeing this more as buyers don’t want to lose out on a home, if they can avoid doing so. In this example, if they were putting 5% down and getting a conventional loan, they would now be putting 5% of $280K down, and on top of that, paying $10K to make up the difference for the low appraisal, in addition to closing costs.”

“If the borrower has enough money down and they’re agreeable, we can adjust the loan-to-value to keep their out of pocket money the same. Here’s what I mean by that. We have someone buying a home for $290K and putting 20% down. This would make the loan amount $232K and down payment $58K. Let’s assume the home appraises for $280K and they want to keep their total out of pocket money the same, but agree to pay a total of $290K. We can lower the down payment from $58K to $48K and they can use that $10K to make up the difference. This keeps their total out of pocket funds overall, the same. In this case, they would now be putting $48K down on $280K and the loan-to-value would go from 80% to 82.9%. This would add a small PMI payment, but help the borrower accomplish their overall goal when it comes to total money, out of pocket.”

“As lenders, we can only lend up to the lesser of the appraised value or the purchase price. Always the lesser of the two.”

“If this isn’t agreed upon upfront, we first go to each REALTOR® and ask for any additional comparable properties the appraiser may have missed. At the permission of the buyer, we’ll have the buyer’s agent review the appraisal with them to see if any material items were missed. Is the bedroom count correct? Bathroom count? Square footage? Etc.”

“If no mistakes were made and the value isn’t able to be met, the REALTORS® involved would need to see if any re-negotiation can take place. If all parties can work it out or compromise on it, we move forward. If not, unfortunately, it may be a dead deal.”

There’s no “one-size-fits-all” solution for when the home in a real estate transaction fails to appraise, but we’ve attempted to give structure to variables that might come into play. We hope homebuyers have gained some valuable insight and can proceed with more confidence toward settlement.

 

For a related topic, see Why would I need an appraiser?

As a homeowner, why would I need the services of a real estate appraiser? And is one needed if I already have a business relationship with a REALTOR®? These are great questions, but before we dive in and answer them, let’s establish what we mean when we say “appraisal.”

For our purposes here, we’re not concerned with commercial real estate appraisals. These are a whole different animal and are sought after less than residential ones in our region. By appraisals, we’re referring to an accurate estimate of a home’s current/fair market value (emphasis added). We’ll break down the difference between this and how we understand a comparable market analysis, but it’s safe to say appraisals hold much more weight. Furthermore, an appraisal, which is required by a homebuyer’s lender, for instance, is completed by a licensed appraiser and not solely a real estate agent.

While some homeowners, who are looking to sell their home, might request from a REALTOR® what’s called a comparable market analysis (CMA), it’s critical to recognize the distinction between it and an appraisal. While agents might use methods of comparison similar to appraisers, they aren’t licensed appraisers with no motivation for the sale of the property. Generally speaking, CMAs are for agent purposes (listing a home for sale, data to support a buyer’s offer) and appraisals are for lending purposes. Read more about their differences here.

Regardless of the business relationship you have with a real estate professional, unless he/she has a license to appraise property in that state, his/her assessment on what a property is worth won’t hold water with the mortgage lender actually making the investment on the home on your behalf (whether you’re the homeowner or mortgagor). Not all appraisals involve banks though. “There are many reasons someone would hire an appraiser,” exclaims Maria Muchal Berta, Owner/Certified Real Estate Appraiser for Chiave Appraisal Group and Associate Broker with Realty Network Group. “One reason is if a buyer is using cash to purchase a property, meaning there are no banks involved in the transaction. It gives the buyer a piece of mind knowing they’re not overpaying for a property. Other common reasons for hiring an appraiser include divorces, settling estates, refinancing, applying for home equity loans, appealing tax assessments or they’re just curious about their home’s worth.”

We hope this elucidates why someone might need the services of a real estate appraiser. It’s a complicated market out there! Make sure you have the right people and tools at your fingertips. If you need further clarification regarding homebuying, look into this resource.

Give a warm welcome to our newest real estate professional, Valerie Altier! She brings into our market a wealth of knowledge from the business and accounting fields. As a graduate of Penn State University, Valerie managed an accounting firm and also worked as the chief administrative officer at a local tech company. Her background in this field coupled with her passion for real estate, has our company, Realty Network Group, even more excited for connecting buyers and sellers in 2022.

Though this is the start of something new, Valerie has always found real estate interesting and has been involved in the ebb and flow of the industry through her husband’s investments, home construction and sales over the past twenty-five years. “We’re excited to welcome an agent who is both a true professional, who loves our region, as well as someone who’s dedicated to her family,” expressed Mark DeStefano, CEO of Realty Network Group.

Valerie enjoys spending time with family and friends. She loves to travel. Her work ethic, business skill sets and life experiences position her well for what she’ll encounter in real estate. “One thing I’m looking forward to the most in this business is its uniqueness,” proclaims Valerie. “Each client is one-of-a-kind. Every home is different. Each day is extraordinary.” Having lived in Northeastern Pennsylvania her entire life, Valerie can point her clients in the right direction, navigating them through various neighborhoods and school districts available to them. “Seeking out that feeling of comfort or home is paramount to buyers and it is important to me as well,” exclaimed Valerie. “I certainly discovered that feeling at Realty Network Group. It’s reputation, size and support were some of the things that attracted me to this firm.”

Are you looking to buy or sell? Valerie Altier will listen to your needs and help you achieve your objectives by discovering properties that may even surpass your expectations. Get started by calling Valerie today at 570-702-1104 or via [email protected].

Make sure to dress warm this year because the Festival of Ice 2022 will be a cold one. But we’re game, because nothing says “ice festival” like dripping sculptures! As of Friday morning, temperatures for this weekend’s festival in the Abingtons will hit highs of 28°, 13° and 24° F respectively, Friday (January 28th) through Sunday (January 30th).

This year’s theme may not be as captivating as some of the previous festivals in recent years, including Ice Wars (Star Wars) or Icetendo, but you have to admit there’s something majestic about the wilderness, even when it’s cold. The 17th Annual Clarks Summit Festival of Ice [though it should be the 18th Annual, 2021’s festival was also the 17th for some reason], titled “Frozen Wilderness,” will have a fierce display of sculptures this weekend. No, there won’t be an Elsa, but you’ll find a wolf, a wolverine, a reindeer, birds, bears and so much more.

Check this out, there’s even an elk outside our business!

Frozen Wilderness

We hope you can stop by Realty Network Group and catch a glimpse of this beauty. There’s also so much to do in and around downtown Clarks Summit. Support small business and shop State Street! Enjoy a hot chocolate, walk around and take in all the sights of the “Frozen Wilderness” compliments of Sculpted Ice Works and Darlene Sarcevic Milas (whose paintings you’ll find on storefronts).

The festival begins on Friday with a parade at 6 PM on State Street. Also, be sure not to miss Fire & Ice at the Waverly Community House [1115 North Abington Road in Waverly] happening from 1-3 PM on Saturday, January 29th, with a live carving demo at 1:30 PM on the front lawn – a polar bear and penguins. We’re sponsoring that event as well so be sure not to miss it.

It should be a memorable weekend and thankfully a cold one too! We hope to see you there.

 

Mark your calendars: The winter celebrations continue next weekend. February 4th-6th is the Scranton Ice Festival.

Downsizing your home is always a bit tricky. If you have a pet, it can become a hair more challenging. Luckily, with the right approach, you can downsize successfully. Here are some best practices that can help.

Plan For Your Home Showings

If you’re selling your current house, you’ll need to take some extra steps because you have a pet. Along with cleaning extra thoroughly to ensure there are no pet odors or errant fur, you’ll need to find a place for your pet to go during showings.

Leaving your pet roaming in your house during showings is never a good idea. It could put both your pet and visitors at risk. Plus, some prospective buyers might view your property as riskier, worrying about pet-related damage that could be present.

If you can’t keep your pet with you during showings, speak with family, friends or neighbors to see if they can help. Otherwise, consider a doggy daycare.

Pare Down Your Stuff Properly

As you downsize your stuff to prepare for a smaller property, don’t forget your pet’s needs. While taking a ratty pet bed or old toy with you might not seem necessary, bringing familiar, well-loved objects into the new house can make your pet more comfortable during the transition. So, make sure to keep a few older things that your pet adores. That way, they’ll be something familiar waiting for them in your new home.

Prepare For The Home Purchase

Before you start searching for a new home, you need to get your financial life in order. When you’re taking out a mortgage, the lender will examine your financial situation from several angles. Along with checking your income, credit score and financial assets, lenders will calculate your debt-to-income ratio to determine what you can afford.

You can check your own debt-to-income ratio by taking your monthly debt payment total and dividing that by your gross monthly income. Generally speaking, below 36 percent (0.36 for the calculation) is best. However, some lenders may go forward with a 43 percent, though that isn’t broadly the case.

Finding The Right New Home

Once it’s time to locate the right house for you and your pet, you want to be strategic. If you find a property that might meet your needs, take a moment to research animal-related regulations in that area. Some places have exotic animal and urban livestock restrictions. There can also be breed-specific legislation for dogs in some cities.

After determining that your pet is welcome in the city, examine the property with your pet’s needs in mind. Figure out if the property meets your cumulative requirements, as is, or if modifications might be necessary.

For example, you may need to add pet doors to allow your pet to freely enter and exit the house. Ramps might be a good addition if you have an aging or smaller pet and stairs could be a challenge. If a particular plant in the yard could harm your pet, you might need to remove it.

Another modification you might need to make is adding or replacing a fence. While this may seem like a simple undertaking, it’s actually incredibly cumbersome, especially if you’re working on it solo. As a result, connecting with local contractors in your area is usually a better bet.

Before you meet with a fencing contractor, discuss your needs and request quotes from several in your area. Read online reviews about Angi fencing professionals to learn more about the companies and make sure that they are licensed, bonded and insured and that they check for local utility lines before starting. On average, homeowners spend around $4,500 on a new fence (though the price does vary depending on materials, size and location). As a result, you want to make sure you get the best contractor for the job, ensuring it’s money well spent.

Downsizing and moving are difficult on their own, let alone when you have a pet involved. So, take some time to strategize the move, make sure your pet is well taken care of and be ready to embark on the next chapter of your life.

Whether you’re buying or selling a home, work with the experienced real estate professionals at Realty Network Group.

 

[This content is compliments of Furever Friend. Image for this post – Unsplash]

Theresa DeMario Plisko becomes the newest addition to join Realty Network Group. As someone who has more or less lived her whole life in Northeastern Pennsylvania, Theresa knows the communities and markets well within this region. Though she excels in areas such as Moosic, Taylor and Old Forge, she looks forward to assisting homebuyers and sellers throughout the Greater Scranton area as well.

Over the past five years, Theresa has grown into her role as a successful REALTOR®. Prior to that she worked with her husband’s construction company for over twenty-five years. Through this experience, she understands how to coach sellers to effectively list and buyers on what to look for when searching for a home. “The reward in this business comes when my clients discover what they’re looking for,” exclaims Theresa. “The timetable varies from person to person, but the important thing I like them to remember is we’ll achieve our goals if we take it one step at time.” To her buyers, she reviews the pros and cons of homes presently on the market. To her sellers, she’ll have candid conversations about pricing, staging, among other things, even if it’s not what they want to hear.

Theresa’s approach to real estate over the years has defined her together with how she cares about her clients and their investments. She has many other strengths, including an understanding of market trends, effectively pricing a home, curb appeal, home construction, home staging and design. “I sought out a company with a strong reputation, who is respected among my peers,” underscored Theresa. “This was one of the reasons I became part of Realty Network Group. They’re a smaller company, which has similar camaraderie to the real estate business I first worked with, The Agency Real Estate Group.”

Real estate is the perfect match for agents like Theresa, who truly enjoy pairing buyers with properties that make sense for them and their families. Buying a home is a huge investment and it shouldn’t be taken lightly. If you’re looking to buy or sell a home, choose a real estate professional who is easy to work with and who has the expertise to deliver the results you’re seeking. Contact Theresa DeMario Plisko today at 570-851-8511 or via email at [email protected].

Realty Network Group’s newest REALTOR®, Lisa Armetta, looks forward to the demands of today’s real estate market. Lisa has lived in Northeastern Pennsylvania her whole life. She understands the region, the culture, but most especially its inhabitants. “Our community is loaded with hidden treasures, including its people,” attests Lisa. “Locals need an advocate who will act (when need be) and guide them through the real estate search, transaction and beyond.”

With over thirty years experience in all facets of the restaurant and bar industry, Lisa understands firsthand how to treat clients well. Repeat business has always been extremely important to her! When customers come back, time and time again, it says something about your business: your product and your personal brand. Leaning upon her achievements in managing thriving area businesses, her focus now has shifted. Running a successful real estate business is her goal.

It’s important to work with professionals who understand how daunting the purchase of a home or business can be — it’s a large investment, to say the least. Lisa recognizes how vital it is for those involved to be comfortable with their purchase. Her wish is for her clients to not only see the property for what it is, but also be able to experience it for what it could be, its potential, a reflection of them.

“I chose Realty Network Group because it’s a small business, who’s very involved in our community,” asserts Lisa. “They have a wonderful reputation for supporting their agents and their clients. I’ve spent most of my career building small businesses, where people are family. I desired a company who was inline with that philosophy. My hope is to help prospective buyers find the right property to build their ‘family,’ even if it’s a business one, and help sellers find the right buyer.”

Being involved in real estate over the years, Lisa has a good understanding of potential setbacks for buyers and sellers. Forward-thinking is essential in this business. When Lisa sees opportunity for her and her clients, she acts. She’s an achiever, who will work tirelessly for her clients’ needs. She’s ready for the challenges that lie ahead in this market as well as the next one.

Seeking the services of a professional, but you’re hesitant because of a prior bad experience? If you’re thinking about making a move in 2021, call Lisa Armetta today at 570-840-1793 or via email at [email protected].